Technology Law Blog

Does Apple’s Siri Record and Store Everything You Say?

Picture of Siri on iPhoneMany people love having an application on their iPhone that can convert nearly anything they say into text.  But what does Apple do with what you say to Siri?

Most people are unaware that everything you say to Siri is sent to a data center in North Carolina.  It is sent to Apple in order to convert what you say into text.

But what does Apple do with all of this information?  No one knows exactly.  The iPhone Software License Agreement states, “When you use Siri or Dictation, the things you say will be recorded and sent to Apple in order to convert what you say into text and, for Siri, to also process your requests.”

Now this may not be any different than what Facebook, Google, or any other online site does, but some companies have concerns.  IBM allows employees to bring personal cell phones to work, but has banned the use of Siri on those phones.  IBM is worried that Apple could record anything said at IBM’s headquarters and potentially gain an advantage.

In fact, the American Civil Liberties Union has issued a warning regarding Siri.  But many people think the concern is overblown. 

Often, when sites and applications acquire personal information from users, the ultimate user experience is improved.  Siri uses your location to help give you directions, and Siri “learns” how to understand what you are saying by “remembering” what you said before.  In the inevitable increase of technology into every facet of our lives, there must be a tradeoff.  Privacy concerns will always be weighed against improved services. 

If you have any questions about Apple’s privacy policy, you may want to read it for yourself.

Categories: Privacy


Associate
Lansing
T: 517.371.8257

John brings a unique perspective to Foster Swift with his practical experience as an entrepreneur, business owner and manager. He focuses in the areas of business and corporate law, and technology law.

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Associate
Lansing
T: 517.371.8139

focuses his practice in the areas of Michigan non-property tax disputes, business entity selection, corporate transactions, and information technology.

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