Technology Law Blog

Showing 20 posts in Copyright.

Lights, Camera, Action: Legal Considerations for the Entertainment Industry

filmingOrganizations within the entertainment industry have a unique set of legal considerations. To better understand these considerations, Attorney John Mashni is presenting an introductory and advanced level course on the "Legal Aspects of a Feature Film," and a course on "The Law of Music" to the NALA Paralegal Association at their annual conference and expo. The NALA annual conference is taking place in Las Vegas July 13 through July 15. Read More ›

Categories: Copyright, Intellectual Property

Copyright Basics: 3 Tips for Small Businesses Regarding Copyright

When it comes to copyrights, there are several common mistakes small businesses can make. If you are putting together marketing materials or a website and you download a photo online, often times that photo is protected by a copyright and is owned by someone else. This could lead to copyright infringement. Learn about a few other common copyright mistakes in the video below.

Categories: Copyright, Intellectual Property

Intellectual Property: Copyrights

Business owners need to understand copyrights. The video below continues Foster Swift's Legal Basics for Business Video Series by explaining the basics of copyrights. Learn more about copyrights and how they are important to your business in this short video clip.

Categories: Copyright, Intellectual Property

YouTube Will Pay Content Creators’ Legal Fees in Defense Of Fair Use

Tech continues to test the elasticity of the law and use case precedent as its own disruptor. The Google Goliath, YouTube, is moving forward to pay several video content creators’ legal fees in copyright infringement disputes that use the defense of fair use.

A copyright is an expression of an original idea through words, music, pictures, computer programs, or any other method conveying ideas as works of authorship. The copyright is governed by federal law and is, unlike many of our laws, explicitly identified in the U.S. Constitution. A copyright gives authors the exclusive control of their works of authorship, including derivative rights. An author controls whether or not the copyright – work of authorship - may be used or displayed.

There is, currently, one minor exception: fair use. Read More ›

Categories: Copyright, Intellectual Property, News & Events

Does my Small Business Need to Protect its Intellectual Property?

There are four basic kinds of intellectual property that you can protect: trademarks, copyrights, patents and trade secrets. At the very early stages of starting a business you will want to protect your business name or brand through a trademark. Learn more about intellectual property basics and what you need to protect, in the Youtube video below.

Categories: Copyright, Intellectual Property, Patents, Trade Secrets, Trademarks

Why You Should Register Your Copyrights: The Benefits of Registration Under The Copyright Act

A copyright is automatically created upon the completion of an original work of authorship that is fixed in a tangible medium of expression. While an automatic copyright protects that work, a formal registration of copyrighted materials within three months of release to the general public provides extra benefits that can prove extremely valuable to the owner. These benefits serve to not only protect the copyrighted work, but also to provide additional remedies for the author in the event of infringement. Registering a copyright is as simple as submitting an application to the United States Copyright Office with a minimal filing fee and a copy of the copyrighted material. Then, once the work is registered, the benefits begin immediately. Read More ›

Categories: Copyright, Intellectual Property

Three Tips for Music Licensing in Media Production

Obtaining the proper music licenses helps protect your production from a copyright lawsuit, which can ultimately prevent the release of your final product. Watch the short video clip below for these three practical tips on music licensing.

  1. Recognize the need to obtain a license for ALL music.
  2. Know "sync" and "master use" rights.
  3. Start the licensing process early.

Categories: Copyright, Intellectual Property

The Final Chapter on Aereo’s Chapter 11

On June 25, 2014, the United States Supreme Court ruled that cloud-based television-streaming service, Aereo, violated U.S. copyright law and its subsequent Chapter 11 bankruptcy filing has come to a dramatic conclusion. We have followed this case throughout its lifecycle, and updated this blog with posts like this one to keep you up-to-date on its implications for copyright and telecommunications regulations. Now, as reported by Inc. and other media, the company’s sale of its technology – once considered disruptive and wildly innovative – for a “disappointing” $2 million brings the technology company’s story to an end.

Following the Supreme Court’s ruling, Aereo filed for bankruptcy, and recently conducted an auction sale of its intellectual property and hardware in order to raise funds to pay creditors. The company sold its name and customer list to TiVo, and its patent portfolio to RPX Corporation, which has been categorized by some as a patent troll. Aereo sold off its remaining equipment to Alliance Technologies. Aereo had expected the sale to raise up to $40 million. Read More ›

Categories: Chapter 11, Copyright, News & Events

Chilling Effect or Creative Boundaries? Full Impact of “Blurred Lines” Ruling Still Hazy

A decision in a copyright infringement case concerning the song “Blurred Lines” casts ambiguity on the future of expression and copyright protection in the music industry. On Tuesday, March 10, an eight-person jury in Los Angeles concluded that Robin Thicke and Pharrell Williams, the performer and songwriter-producer of the most successful song of 2013, “Blurred Lines,” committed copyright infringement by using elements of the 1977 Marvin Gaye song, “Got to Give it Up,” without proper credit. Read More ›

Categories: Copyright, Intellectual Property, News & Events

End of the Road for Aereo? Embattled Video Streaming Startup Files for Bankruptcy

In a prior post we reported that in June the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that streaming television service, Aereo, violated U.S. copyright law in connection with its business and legal battle with the major broadcast networks. At the time, we posed the question of whether, despite losing the lawsuit, Aereo had a future as a cable company?

The answer, it seems, is no. On November 20, Aereo filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for for the Southern District of New York, listing assets of $20.5 million and debt of $4.2 million. Read More ›

Categories: Chapter 11, Copyright, News & Events